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City's centennial time capsule stuffed with memorabilia

Duncan’s centennial time capsule is filled with memorabilia galore, including letters from Ecole Duncan Elementary students. Principal Pedro Mengual poses in city hall with students Ella Rozenberger (clockwise, lower left), Clayton Reymerink, Emily Moir,  Jasmine Hurson, and Julianna Rostas. Councillor Sharon Jackson’s granddaughter, Hannah, holds Twinkies also capsule-bound. Jackson hefts the maquette of carver Calvin Hunt’s totem pole to sit near the capsule to be buried soon in Charles Hoey Park. - Peter W. Rusland
Duncan’s centennial time capsule is filled with memorabilia galore, including letters from Ecole Duncan Elementary students. Principal Pedro Mengual poses in city hall with students Ella Rozenberger (clockwise, lower left), Clayton Reymerink, Emily Moir, Jasmine Hurson, and Julianna Rostas. Councillor Sharon Jackson’s granddaughter, Hannah, holds Twinkies also capsule-bound. Jackson hefts the maquette of carver Calvin Hunt’s totem pole to sit near the capsule to be buried soon in Charles Hoey Park.
— image credit: Peter W. Rusland

Twinkies might still be edible in 2037 when Duncanites open their centennial time capsule.

Councillor Sharon Jackson says a pack of those snacks will be part of the city's capsule being buried, possibly in Charles Hoey Park, early next year.

"We're not doing a ceremony because it's too much like a burial, but we'll let people know where and when it'll be buried," she said.

The waterproof container is being stuffed with everything from students' letters to themselves, centennial baby certificates, and local newspaper clippings, to photos, Paul Ruszel's centennial song CD, centennial geocaching coins, artwork and much more.

"There'll be mementos from every (centennial) event we've had, including a photo album of all of our events, and a day in the life of Duncan taken by people 10 to 60 years old asked to take pictures of their day," said centennial committee and capsule captain Jackson.

"There's still room for more letters to the future."

Duncan's centennial year officially ends March 3I.

It was believed the time capsule may be buried near Duncan's new centennial totem pole carved by Calvin Hunt. It's being publicly celebrated at 1 p.m. Saturday in Hoey Park, beside the train station.

Jackson was jazzed about dedicating Duncan's largest totem, carved from a 1,000-year-old cedar tree.

The massive monument to Aboriginal myths and Duncan's history required it being anchored by a seven-foot hole filled with 10,000 pounds of cement, plus a special nine-inch steel centre rod.

Hunt's pole bid was picked from six or seven others gained by council.

"His proposal was under budget, and included a ceremony, and guaranteed a three-month delivery.

"It tells the story about Duncan and Cowichan Tribes," she said.

"Other proposals were a much-later delivery, were far over our budget ($60,000 from Canada Heritage Trust), or didn't tell the story."

Meanwhile, the time capsule's 2037 re-opening date was pending.

"I'll leave that up to the council of the day — and it sure as hell won't be me," Jackson joked.

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