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Dateline Cowichan: Much council debate gives birth to arena

The 4-Ways Bruins peewee house hockey team of 1969-70 at Fuller Lake Arena, back row from left, included: Trevor Halliday, Don Bodger, Eldon Halldorson, Tim Hollett, John Kerr, Terry Akiyama, Wes Swain, Jeff Hagg. Front: Casey Wickham, Derrick Eastman, John Lemmons, Ted Negrin, Van Porter, Terry Flatt, Ricky Greenhorn, Greg Hollett, Greg Powers. Coaches, from left, were: Gordie Kerr and Carl Wright.   - courtesy John Kerr
The 4-Ways Bruins peewee house hockey team of 1969-70 at Fuller Lake Arena, back row from left, included: Trevor Halliday, Don Bodger, Eldon Halldorson, Tim Hollett, John Kerr, Terry Akiyama, Wes Swain, Jeff Hagg. Front: Casey Wickham, Derrick Eastman, John Lemmons, Ted Negrin, Van Porter, Terry Flatt, Ricky Greenhorn, Greg Hollett, Greg Powers. Coaches, from left, were: Gordie Kerr and Carl Wright.
— image credit: courtesy John Kerr

It’s always been a bit of a mystery to me why an ice arena was built near Chemainus a decade before Duncanites could skate indoors locally.

What we do know is that the Fuller Lake arena was North Cowichan’s Centennial project, and that its Trans Canada site was not the unanimous choice of council in December 1964.

But are we really expected to believe Reeve Don Morton’s argument? Duncan downtown didn’t even have enough room for parking, so how would they have room for the 20 acres needed for an arena, he said, adding that he did expect future recreational expansion in the Duncan area.

There was more argument over whether the arena should be in Chemainus or at Fuller Lake. Councillor George Whittaker fell into the Chemainus site ranks.

It should be close to population so children could walk or cycle; there’d be reduced cost of services; better police protection; it would be close to the ball park, the police station, schools and inter-school activities; and would give cohesion to the community and discourage vandalism, he said.

I’m sure North Cowichan has considered all these points (and more) as councillors select a site for a skateboard park.

 

1964: blood

George Cobbold, Cowichan Branch Red Cross blood donor drive chairman, said the goal of an upcoming clinic was 450 pints, about the same amount of blood as was used annually at King’s Daughters’ Hospital.

1964: roadwork

A proposed North Cowichan road program for the following year including ditches and drainage would cost an estimated $220,730. The previous year’s program outlay was $195,000.

1964: elections

In Lake Cowichan elections, Archibald Greenwell and Robert Turner were opposed by Laurence Bailey and Howard Gibson. In North Cowichan, George Whittaker, Dennis Hogan and Gerald Smith stood against Bill Dyvewaardt and Louis Shelling.

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